Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21981
Appears in Collections:History and Politics Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: ‘The Worst Disaster Suffered by the People of Scotland in Recorded History’: Climate Change, Dearth and Pathogens in the Long Fourteenth Century
Authors: Oram, Richard
Contact Email: rdo1@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Climate change
epidemic disease
epizootic disease
Scotland
fourteenth-century
Black Death
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
Citation: Oram R (2015) ‘The Worst Disaster Suffered by the People of Scotland in Recorded History’: Climate Change, Dearth and Pathogens in the Long Fourteenth Century, Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 144.
Abstract: Informing historical and archaeological discourse with environmental data culled from documentary and climate proxy records is transforming understanding of political, social economic and cultural change across the North Atlantic and European Atlantic regions generally. Limited record evidence and region-specific proxy data has hindered engagement by historians of medieval Scotland with the exploration of environmental factors as motors for long term and large scale change and adoption of the interdisciplinary methodologies involved in their use. This essay seeks to provide an overview of the potential for such data and methodologies in providing context for the well-rehearsed narratives of political upheaval and socio-economic realignment that have characterised much past Scottish historical discourse.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21981
Rights: Publisher policy allows this work to be made available in this repository. Published in Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland by Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.
Affiliation: AH Management and Support Team

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