Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21729
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Plasma microRNA levels differ between endurance and strength athletes
Authors: Wardle, Sophie
Bailey, Mark E S
Kilikevicius, Audrius
Malkova, Dalia
Wilson, Richard H
Venckunas, Tomas
Moran, Colin Neil
Contact Email: colin.moran@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: 16-Apr-2015
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Wardle S, Bailey MES, Kilikevicius A, Malkova D, Wilson RH, Venckunas T & Moran CN (2015) Plasma microRNA levels differ between endurance and strength athletes, PLoS ONE, 10 (4), Art. No.: e0122107.
Abstract: Aim: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are stable in the circulation and are likely to function in inter-organ communication during a variety of metabolic responses that involve changes in gene expression, including exercise training. However, it is unknown whether differences in circulating-miRNA (c-miRNA) levels are characteristic of training modality. Methods: We investigated whether levels of candidate c-miRNAs differ between elite male athletes of two different training modalities (n = 10 per group) - endurance (END) and strength (STR) - and between these groups and untrained controls (CON; n = 10). Fasted, non-exercised, morning plasma samples were analysed for 14 c-miRNAs (miR-1, miR-16-2, miR-20a-1, miR-21, miR-93, miR-103a, miR-133a, miR-146a, miR-192, miR-206, miR-221, miR-222, miR-451, miR-499). Moreover, we investigated whether c-miRNA levels were associated with quantitative performance-related phenotypes within and between groups. Results: miR-222 was present at different levels in the three participant groups (p = 0.028) with the highest levels being observed in END and the lowest in STR. A number of other c-miRNAs were present at higher levels in END than in STR (relative to STR, ± 1 SEM; miR-222: 1.94 fold (1.73-2.18), p = 0.011; miR-21: 1.56 fold (1.39-1.74), p = 0.013; miR-146a: 1.50 fold (1.38-1.64), p = 0.019; miR-221: 1.51 fold (1.34-1.70), p = 0.026). Regression analyses revealed several associations between candidate c-miRNA levels and strength-related performance measures before and after adjustment for muscle or fat mass, but not following adjustment for group. Conclusion: Certain c-miRNAs (miR-222, miR-21, miR-146a and miR-221) differ between endurance- and resistance-trained athletes and thus have potential as useful biomarkers of exercise training and / or play a role in exercise mode-specific training adaptations. However, levels of these c-miRNAs are probably unrelated to muscle bulk or fat reserves.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21729
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122107
Rights: © 2015 Wardle et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
Affiliation: Sport
University of Glasgow
Lithuanian Academy of Physical Education, Kaunas, Lithuania
University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow
Lithuanian Academy of Physical Education, Kaunas, Lithuania
Sport

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