Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21691
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Increased net muscle protein balance in response to simultaneous and separate ingestion of carbohydrate and essential amino acids following resistance exercise
Authors: Witard, Oliver
Cocke, Tara L
Ferrando, Arny A
Wolfe, Robert R
Tipton, Kevin
Contact Email: oliver.witard@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: nutrient timing
resistance exercise recovery
muscle protein balance
muscle protein synthesis
Issue Date: Mar-2014
Publisher: Canadian Science Publishing
Citation: Witard O, Cocke TL, Ferrando AA, Wolfe RR & Tipton K (2014) Increased net muscle protein balance in response to simultaneous and separate ingestion of carbohydrate and essential amino acids following resistance exercise , Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 39 (3), pp. 329-339.
Abstract: Relative to essential amino acids (EAAs), carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion stimulates a delayed response of net muscle protein balance (NBAL). We investigated if staggered ingestion of CHO and EAA would superimpose the response of NBAL following resistance exercise, thus resulting in maximal anabolic stimulation. Eight recreationally trained subjects completed 2 trials: combined (COMB - drink 1, CHO+EAA; drink 2, placebo) and separated (SEP - drink 1, CHO; drink 2, EAA) post-exercise ingestion of CHO and EAA. Drink 1 was administered 1 h following an acute exercise bout and was followed 1 h later by drink 2. A primed, continuous infusion of l-[ring-13C6]-phenylalanine was combined with femoral arteriovenous sampling and muscle biopsies for the determination of muscle protein kinetics. Arterial amino acid concentrations increased following ingestion of EAA in both conditions. No difference between conditions was observed for phenylalanine delivery to the leg (COMB: 167 ± 23 μmol·min-1·(100 mL leg vol)-1 × 6 h; SEP: 167 ± 21 μmol·min-1·(100 mL leg vol)-1 × 6 h, P > 0.05). In the first hour following ingestion of the drink containing EAA, phenylalanine uptake was 50% greater for the SEP trial than the COMB trial. However, phenylalanine uptake was similar for COMB (110 ± 19 mg) and SEP (117 ± 24 mg) over the 6 h period. These data suggest that whereas separation of CHO and EAA ingestion following exercise may have a transient physiological impact on NBAL, this response is not reflected over a longer period. Thus, separation of CHO and EAA ingestion is unnecessary to optimize post-exercise muscle protein metabolism.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21691
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2013-0264
Rights: Publisher policy allows this work to be made available in this repository. Published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 2014, 39(3): 329-339, 10.1139/apnm-2013-0264. Copyright NRC Research Press. The published version is available at: http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/apnm-2013-0264#.VTop_U90zcs
Affiliation: Sport
University of Texas Medical Branch
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Sport

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