Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21539
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Patient factors associated with SSRI dose for depression treatment in general practice: a primary care cross sectional study
Authors: Johnson, Chris F
Dougall, Nadine
Williams, Brian
MacGillivray, Steve
Buchanan, Alasdair I
Hassett, Richard D
Contact Email: nadine.dougall@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Family practice
Chronic disease
Depression
Antidepressive agents
Benzodiazepines
Issue Date: 24-Dec-2014
Publisher: BioMed Central
Citation: Johnson CF, Dougall N, Williams B, MacGillivray S, Buchanan AI & Hassett RD Patient factors associated with SSRI dose for depression treatment in general practice: a primary care cross sectional study, BMC Family Practice, 115, Art. No.: 210.
Abstract: Background Antidepressant prescribing continues to rise. Increased long-term prescribing and higher doses are contributing to current growth; however, patient factors associated with the use of higher doses remain unknown. This study?s aim was to investigate patient factors associated with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) prescribed daily dose for depression treatment in general practice. Methods A stratified sample of low to high prescribing practices were selected. Routine individual patient-level data were extracted one practice at a time: September 2009 to January 2011. Patients included were ≥18 years, and prescribed an SSRI for depression. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to assess individual predictor variables on SSRI daily dose by standard therapeutic dose versus higher dose, as SSRIs demonstrate flat dose response curves for depression treatment. Predictor variables included: age, gender, deprivation, co-morbidity, smoking status, being prescribed the same SSRI for ≥2 years, and patients? general practice. For a subgroup of patients a second sub-group analysis included long-term benzodiazepine and/or z-hypnotic (B&Z) as a predictor variable. Results Inter-practice SSRI prescribing varied significantly; practice point prevalence ranged from 2.5% (94/3697) to 11.9% (359/3007) of the practice population ≥18 years old; median 7.3% (250/3421) (χ 2 = 2277.2, df = 10, p < 0.001). Overall point prevalence was 6.3% (3518/52575), with 5.8% (3066/52575) prescribed SSRIs for depression of whom 84.7% (2596/3066) had data for regression analysis. Higher SSRI doses were significantly associated with, in descending order of magnitude, individual practice attended, being prescribed the same SSRI for ≥2 years (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.80, 95% CI 1.49 to 2.17, p < 0.001) and living in a more deprived area (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.16, p = 0.009). Higher SSRI doses in the B&Z subgroup were significantly associated with individual practice attended, being prescribed a long-term B&Z (OR 2.05 95% CI 1.47 to 2.86, p < 0.001) and being prescribed the same SSRI for ≥2 years (OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.53 to 2.47, p < 0.001). Conclusion Higher SSRI doses for depression were associated with practice attended and being prescribed the same antidepressant for ≥2 years. As long-term antidepressant use increases, the use of higher doses may further contribute to prescribing growth.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21539
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12875-014-0210-9
Rights: © Johnson et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Affiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport
NMAHP Research
NMAHP Research
University of Dundee
Glasgow City CHP
NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

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