Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21515
Appears in Collections:Economics Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: A meta-analysis of risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder in children and adolescents
Authors: Trickey, David
Siddaway, Andrew
Meiser-Steadman, Richard
Serpell, Lucy
Field, Andy
Contact Email: andy.siddaway@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Post-traumatic stress disorder
Risk factor
Children
Adolescent
Predictor
Issue Date: Mar-2012
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Trickey D, Siddaway A, Meiser-Steadman R, Serpell L & Field A (2012) A meta-analysis of risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder in children and adolescents, Clinical Psychology Review, 32 (2), pp. 122-138.
Abstract: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex and chronic disorder that causes substantial distress and interferes with social and educational functioning. Consequently, identifying the risk factors that make a child more likely to experience traumatic distress is of academic, clinical and social importance. This meta-analysis estimated the population effect sizes of 25 potential risk factors for PTSD in children and adolescents aged 6-18 years across 64 studies (N=32,238). Medium to large effect sizes were shown for many factors relating to subjective experience of the event and post-trauma variables (low social support, peri-trauma fear, perceived life threat, social withdrawal, comorbid psychological problem, poor family functioning, distraction, PTSD at time 1, and thought suppression); whereas pre-trauma variables and more objective measures of the assumed severity of the event generated small to medium effect sizes. This indicates that subjective peri-trauma factors and post-event factors are likely to have a major role in determining whether a child develops PTSD following exposure to a traumatic event. Such factors could potentially be assessed following a potentially traumatic event in order to screen for those most vulnerable to developing PTSD and target treatment efforts accordingly. The findings support the cognitive model of PTSD as a way of understanding its development and guiding interventions to reduce symptoms.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21515
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2011.12.001
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University College London
Management Work and Organisation
University of Cambridge
University College London
University of Sussex

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Siddaway_CPR_2012.pdf450.21 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 31/12/2999     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.