Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21398
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The end of lifelong learning: a post-human condition?
Authors: Edwards, Richard
Contact Email: r.g.edwards@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Apr-2010
Publisher: NIACE
Citation: Edwards R (2010) The end of lifelong learning: a post-human condition?, Studies in the Education of Adults, 42 (1), pp. 5-17.
Abstract: This article explores the significance of theories of the post-human for lifelong learning. Drawing upon the works of Karen Barad and Bruno Latour, it suggests that education has focused on the learning subject as a result of an a priori assumption of a separation of matter from meaning, the object from the subject. By contrast, a post-human intervention points to the constant material entanglement of the human and non-human in the enactment of the world, and thus the problematic status of subjects and objects as separate from one another. This contrast is examined in relation to the distinction made by Latour between matters of fact/objects and matters of concern/things. The article suggests that a post-human condition could signal the end of lifelong learning and provide a rationale for responsible experimentation as a way of enacting an educational purpose.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21398
URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/niace/stea/2010/00000042/00000001/art00002
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: School of Education

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
End of lifelong learning.pdf142.91 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 31/12/2999     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.