Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21230
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Adolescent perceptions of cigarette appearance
Authors: Ford, Allison
Moodie, Crawford
MacKintosh, Anne Marie
Hastings, Gerard
Contact Email: c.s.moodie@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Jun-2014
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Citation: Ford A, Moodie C, MacKintosh AM & Hastings G (2014) Adolescent perceptions of cigarette appearance, European Journal of Public Health, 24 (3), pp. 464-468.
Abstract: Background: To reduce the possibility of cigarette appearance misleading consumers about harm caused by the product, the European Commission's draft Tobacco Products Directive proposed banning cigarettes <7.5 mm in diameter. It appears however, following a plenary vote in the European Parliament, that this will not be part of the final Tobacco Products Directive. To reduce the appeal of cigarettes, the Australian Government banned the use of branding on cigarettes and stipulated a maximum cigarette length as part of the Tobacco Plain Packaging Act. We explored the role, if any, of cigarette appearance on perceptions of appeal and harm among adolescents. Methods: Focus group research with 15-year-olds (N = 48) was conducted in Glasgow (Scotland) to explore young people's perceptions of eight cigarettes differing in length, diameter, colour and decorative design. Results: Slim and superslim cigarettes with white filter tips and decorative features were viewed most favourably and rated most attractive across gender and socio-economic groups. The slimmer diameters of these cigarettes communicated weaker tasting and less harmful looking cigarettes. This was closely linked to appeal as thinness implied a more pleasant and palatable smoke for young smokers. A long brown cigarette was viewed as particularly unattractive and communicated a stronger and more harmful product. Conclusion: This exploratory study provides some support that standardising cigarette appearance could reduce the appeal of cigarettes in adolescents and reduce the opportunity for stick design to mislead young smokers in terms of harm.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21230
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckt161
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
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