Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21223
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Determining the impact of smoking point of sale legislation among youth (Display) study: A protocol for an evaluation of public health policy
Authors: Haw, Sally
Amos, Amanda
Eadie, Douglas
Frank, John W
MacDonald, Laura
MacKintosh, Anne Marie
MacGregor, Andy
Miller, Martine
Pearce, Jamie
Sharp, Clare
Stead, Martine
Tisch, Catherine
van, der Sluijs Winfried
Contact Email: s.j.haw@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Public health
Evaluation
Legislation
Point of sale advertising
Tobacco
Adolescents
Smoking
Issue Date: 14-Mar-2014
Publisher: BioMed Central
Citation: Haw S, Amos A, Eadie D, Frank JW, MacDonald L, MacKintosh AM, MacGregor A, Miller M, Pearce J, Sharp C, Stead M, Tisch C & van der Sluijs W (2014) Determining the impact of smoking point of sale legislation among youth (Display) study: A protocol for an evaluation of public health policy, BMC Public Health, 14 (1), Art. No.: 251.
Abstract: Background: Tobacco advertising and product promotions have been largely banned in the UK but point of sale (POS) tobacco advertising is one of the few places where tobacco products may be legitimately advertised. POS displays have been shown to increase susceptibility to smoking, experimentation and initiation into smoking. These displays may also influence perceived prevalence of smoking and the perception that tobacco products are easily obtained and are a ‘normal' product. A ban of POS tobacco advertising was introduced in Scotland in large tobacco retail outlets of over 280m2 internal sales floor areas (mainly supermarkets) in April 2013 and will be extended to include smaller tobacco retail outlets in April 2015. However, the impact of POS bans on smoking attitudes, behaviours and prevalence has yet to be determined. Methods/design: This study has a multi-modal before and after design and uses mixed methods to collect data, at baseline and then with longitudinal follow-up for 4 years, in four purposively selected communities. For the purposes of the study, community is defined as the catchment areas of the secondary schools selected for study. There are four main components to the on-going study. In each of the four communities, at baseline and in follow-up years, there will be: mapping and spatial analyses of tobacco retail outlets; tobacco advertising and marketing audits of tobacco retail outlets most used by young people; cross-sectional school surveys of secondary school pupils; and focus group interviews with purposive samples of secondary school pupils. The tobacco audit is supplemented by interviews and observations conducted with a panel of tobacco retailers recruited from four matched communities. Discussion: This study examines the impact of the implementation of both a partial and comprehensive ban on point of sale (POS) tobacco advertising on attitudes to smoking, brand awareness, perceived ease of access to tobacco products and youth smoking prevalence. The results will be of considerable interest to policy makers both from the UK and other jurisdictions where they are considering the development and implementation of similar legislation.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21223
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-251
Rights: © 2014 Haw et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Affiliation: HS Research - Stirling
University of Edinburgh
Institute for Social Marketing
University of Edinburgh
Institute for Social Marketing
Institute for Social Marketing
Scottish Centre For Social Research
University of St Andrews
University of Edinburgh
Scottish Centre For Social Research
Institute for Social Marketing
University of Edinburgh
University of St Andrews

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