Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20053
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The outcomes of secure care in Scotland
Authors: Kendrick, Andrew
Walker, Moira
Barclay, Aileen
Hunter, Lynne
Malloch, Margaret
Hill, Malcolm
McIvor, Gill
Contact Email: m.s.malloch@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Adult
Adults
Behaviour
Benefits
care
CONTINUITY
data
DIMENSIONS
Education
Effectiveness
families
FAMILY
Health
ISSUES
other
outcome
outcomes
PEOPLE
relationship
relationships
Research
Scotland
Social Workers
Structure
transition
WHO
young people
Issue Date: Feb-2008
Publisher: The Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research
Citation: Kendrick A, Walker M, Barclay A, Hunter L, Malloch M, Hill M & McIvor G (2008) The outcomes of secure care in Scotland, Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care, 7 (1), pp. 1-13.
Abstract: This paper describes the findings of a three year study of the use and effectiveness of secure accommodation in Scotland. Data were collected on 53 young people shortly after their admission to secure accommodation. Most young people were admitted because they were a danger to themselves and/or they were likely to abscond; a third were considered a danger to others. Secure accommodation was considered to have benefits in relation to keeping young people safe and addressing health issues. On other dimensions, such as behaviour or family relationships, signs of benefit were more ambiguous. Thirty-three young people were considered to have clearly benefited from placement. At follow-up, after two years, outcomes were assessed as: 'good' - 14 (26%); 'medium'- 24 (45 %); and 'poor' - 15 (28%). The research highlighted the importance of effectively managing the transition from secure care. Social workers attributed a good outcome more to an appropriate placement and education being offered when the young person left secure rather than simply the placement itself. A gradual 'step-down' approach from the structure and supervision of the secure setting was also linked to better outcomes. Young people respond well when offered continuity and the opportunity to develop relationships with one or more reliable adults who can help with problems as they arise.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20053
URL: http://www.cyc-net.org/Journals/sjrcc/sjrcc-7-1.html
Rights: Publisher is open-access. Open access publishing allows free access to and distribution of published articles where the author retains copyright of their work by employing a Creative Commons attribution licence. Proper attribution of authorship and correct citation details should be given.
Affiliation: University of Strathclyde
Applied Social Science
University of Stirling
University of Strathclyde
Applied Social Science
University of Glasgow
Applied Social Science

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