Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19989
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Engendering politics and policy: the legacy of New Labour
Authors: Annesley, Claire
Gains, Francesca
Rummery, Kirstein
Contact Email: kirstein.rummery@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: gender
governance
policy change
New Labour
Issue Date: Jul-2010
Publisher: Policy Press
Citation: Annesley C, Gains F & Rummery K (2010) Engendering politics and policy: the legacy of New Labour, Policy and Politics, 38 (3), pp. 389-406.
Abstract: This article analyses the capacity of a single political party - New Labour in the UK - to engender politics and policy. It draws on Kingdon's (1984) policy streams approach to demonstrate how with the election of New Labour in 1997 a window of opportunity emerged for gender changes in political representation, governance and policy terms. It argues that the commitment to engendering politics was an important step towards engendering policy, but that policy promoting gender equality does not automatically follow from more gender-balanced political representation. Despite some successes, gendered policy change is constrained by: the way gendered policy problems are framed; the slow pace of change in institutions of politics and governance; and the limits posed by policy solutions that had to fit with the dominant liberal market economic approach.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19989
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/030557310X521071
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Manchester
University of Manchester
Sociology/Social Pol&Criminology

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