Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19541
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Selective Pressure of Antibiotic Pollution on Bacteria of Importance to Public Health
Authors: Tello, Alfredo
Austin, Brian
Telfer, Trevor
Contact Email: t.c.telfer@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: antibiotic pollution
antibiotic resistance
minimum inhibitory concentration distributions
risk assessment
species sensitivity distributions
Issue Date: Aug-2012
Publisher: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Citation: Tello A, Austin B & Telfer T (2012) Selective Pressure of Antibiotic Pollution on Bacteria of Importance to Public Health, Environmental Health Perspectives, 120 (8), pp. 1100-1106.
Abstract: Background: Many bacteria of clinical importance survive and may grow in different environments. Antibiotic pollution may exert on them a selective pressure leading to an increase in the prevalence of resistance. Objectives: In this study we sought to determine whether environmental concentrations of antibiotics and concentrations representing action limits used in environmental risk assessment may exert a selective pressure on clinically relevant bacteria in the environment. Methods: We used bacterial inhibition as an assessment end point to link antibiotic selective pressures to the prevalence of resistance in bacterial populations. Species sensitivity distributions were derived for three antibiotics by fitting log-logistic models to end points calculated from minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions based on worldwide data collated by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). To place bacteria represented in these distributions in a broader context, we performed a brief phylogenetic analysis. The potentially affected fraction of bacterial genera at measured environmental concentrations of antibiotics and environmental risk assessment action limits was used as a proxy for antibiotic selective pressure. Measured environmental concentrations and environmental risk assessment action limits were also directly compared to wild-type cut-off values. Results: The potentially affected fraction of bacterial genera estimated based on antibiotic concentrations measured in water environments is ≤ 7%. We estimated that measured environmental concentrations in river sediments, swine feces lagoons, liquid manure, and farmed soil inhibit wild-type populations in up to 60%, 92%, 100%, and 30% of bacterial genera, respectively. At concentrations used as action limits in environmental risk assessment, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin were estimated to inhibit wild-type populations in up to 25% and 76% of bacterial genera. Conclusions: Measured environmental concentrations of antibiotics, as well as concentrations representing environmental risk assessment action limits, are high enough to exert a selective pressure on clinically relevant bacteria that may lead to an increase in the prevalence of resistance.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19541
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1104650
Rights: Publisher policy allows this work to be made available in this repository. Published in Environmental Health Perspectives, 2012, 120 (8), pp. 1100-1106 by National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). The original publication is available at: http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1104650/#tab2 Reproduced with permission from Environmental Health Perspectives
Affiliation: University of Stirling
Aquaculture
Aquaculture

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