Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19480
Appears in Collections:Economics Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Using best-worst scaling to explore perceptions of relative responsibility for ensuring food safety
Authors: Erdem, Seda
Rigby, Dan
Wossink, Ada
Contact Email: seda.erdem@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Best worst scaling
Maximum Difference Scaling
Responsibility
Perceptions
Food safety
Issue Date: Dec-2012
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Erdem S, Rigby D & Wossink A (2012) Using best-worst scaling to explore perceptions of relative responsibility for ensuring food safety, Food Policy, 37 (6), pp. 661-670.
Abstract: We examine stakeholders' perceptions of the share of the overall responsibility of each stage in the food supply chain has in ensuring that the meat people cook and eat at home is safe to consume. We elicit these perceptions of relative responsibility via surveys using the best-worst scaling technique and analyse the data via Bayesian estimation of mixed logit models. Results are reported for two groups of stakeholders: consumers and farmers, and for two meat food chains: chicken and beef. The results reveal that consumers tend to think farmers are more responsible for ensuring meat safety than farmers do. Similarly, farmers tend to think consumers have a greater degree of responsibility than consumers believe they have themselves. Such beliefs might affect stakeholders' willingness to take actions and reduce hazards in the supply chain. From a policy perspective, the research findings provide useful insights to support policymakers and other decision-makers in the industry in developing mitigation strategies. Communication with consumers and farmers about emerging food safety problems in a supply chain and their involvement in proactive practices would need to be attuned to their subjective perceptions of relative responsibilities in order for integrated risk management systems to be effective.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19480
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2012.07.010
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Economics
University of Manchester
University of Manchester

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