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Appears in Collections:Management, Work and Organisation Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Association of ambient indoor temperature with body mass index in England
Authors: Daly, Michael
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Keywords: Indoor temperature
Energy balance
Energy expenditure
Issue Date: Mar-2014
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell for The Obesity Society
Citation: Daly M (2014) Association of ambient indoor temperature with body mass index in England, Obesity, 22 (3), pp. 626-629.
Abstract: Objective: Raised ambient temperatures may result in a negative energy balance characterized by decreased food intake and raised energy expenditure. This study tested whether indoor temperatures above the thermoneutral zone for clothed humans (approx. 23 oC) were associated with a reduced body mass index (BMI). Design and Methods: Participants were 100,152 adults (≥ 16 years) drawn from 13 consecutive annual waves of the nationally representative Health Survey for England (1995 - 2007). Results: BMI levels of those residing in air temperatures above 23 oC were lower than those living in an ambient temperature of under 19 oC (b = -.233, SE =.053, p <.001), in analyses that adjusted for participant age, gender, social class, health and the month/year of assessment. Robustness tests showed that high indoor temperatures were associated with reduced BMI levels in winter and non-winter months and early (1995 - 2000) and later (2001 - 2007) survey waves. Including additional demographic, environmental, and health behavior variables did not diminish the link between high indoor temperatures and reduced BMI. Conclusions: Elevated ambient indoor temperatures are associated with low BMI levels. Further research is needed to establish the potential causal nature of this relationship.
Type: Journal Article
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Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Management Work and Organisation

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