Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19188
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: E-Cigarettes: Prevalence and Attitudes in Great Britain
Authors: Dockrell, Martin
Morrison, Rory
Bauld, Linda
McNeill, Ann
Contact Email: linda.bauld@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Oct-2013
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Citation: Dockrell M, Morrison R, Bauld L & McNeill A (2013) E-Cigarettes: Prevalence and Attitudes in Great Britain, Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 15 (10), pp. 1737-1744.
Abstract: Introduction: Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are a means of recreational nicotine use that can potentially eliminate the need to smoke tobacco. Little is known about the prevalence of use or smokers' attitudes toward e-cigarettes. This study describes use of and attitudes toward e-cigarettes in Britain. Methods: Respondents from three surveys were recruited from a panel of adults in Britain. Preliminary online and face-to-face qualitative research informed the development of a smokers' survey (486 smokers who had used e-cigarettes and 894 smokers who had not). Representative samples of adults in Britain were then constructed from the panel for population surveys in 2010 (12,597 adults, including 2,297 smokers) and 2012 (12,432 adults, including 2,093 smokers), generating estimates of the prevalence of e-cigarette use and trial in Great Britain. Results: Awareness, trial, and current use increased between 2010 and 2012; for example, current use more than doubled from 2.7% of smokers in 2010 to 6.7% in 2012. The proportion of ever-users currently using e-cigarettes was around one-third in both years. In 2012, 1.1% of ex-smokers reported current e-cigarette use, and a further 2.7% reported past use. Approximately 0.5% of never-smokers reported having tried e-cigarettes. Conclusions: While we found evidence supporting the view that e-cigarette use may be a bridge to quitting, we found very little evidence of e-cigarette use among adults who had never smoked. British smokers would benefit from information about the effective use, risks, and benefits of e-cigarettes, as this might enable the use of e-cigarettes to improve public health.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19188
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntt057
Rights: © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/), which permits non-commercial reproduction and distribution of the work, in any medium, provided the original work is not altered or transformed in any way, and that the work is properly cited. For commercial reuse, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com.
Affiliation: ASH LONDON
University of Edinburgh
Institute for Social Marketing
King's College London

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