Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/18989
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Synthesis of evidence on heterogeneous interventions with multiple outcomes recorded over multiple follow-up times reported inconsistently: A smoking cessation case-study
Authors: Madan, Jason
Chen, Yen-Fu
Aveyard, Paul
Wang, Dechao
Yahaya, Ismail
Munafo, Marcus
Bauld, Linda
Welton, Nicky
Contact Email: linda.bauld@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Cost-effectiveness
Evidence synthesis
Health technology assessment
Network meta-analysis
Smoking cessation
Issue Date: Jan-2014
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Madan J, Chen Y, Aveyard P, Wang D, Yahaya I, Munafo M, Bauld L & Welton N (2014) Synthesis of evidence on heterogeneous interventions with multiple outcomes recorded over multiple follow-up times reported inconsistently: A smoking cessation case-study, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society – Series A, 177 (1), pp. 295-314.
Abstract: Health technology assessment requires the synthesis of evidence from multiple sources to assess the cost-effectiveness of competing interventions. However, the format of the available reported evidence is often complex. We present a case-study of electronic aids to smoking cessation, which raises various methodological challenges. The evidence base evaluated highly complex and diverse interventions, reporting one or both of two different, but related, outcome measures. Furthermore, there were differences between studies in the number and timing of follow-up times reported, whereas 12-month continuous abstinence is required in the cost-effectiveness analysis. We develop a categorization system to evaluate the interventions, and we use network meta-analysis of time-to-relapse model parameters to estimate coherent intervention effects for any pair of categories. We compare the fit of alternative time-to-relapse models and explore the effect of joint models for both outcome measures, which can be used to estimate treatment effects when a given outcome is not reported, so that all the available evidence can be combined.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/18989
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/rssa.12018
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Bristol
University of Birmingham
University of Birmingham
University of Birmingham
University of Birmingham
University of Bristol
Institute for Social Marketing
University of Bristol

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