Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/18362
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Research Reports
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Scoping and Feasibility Study to Develop and Apply a Methodology for Retrospective Adjustment of Alcohol Consumption Data
Authors: Stead, Martine
Bauld, Linda
Angus, Kathryn
MacDonald, Laura
Munafo, Marcus
Attwood, Angela
Ataya, Alia
Fuller, Elizabeth
Pickering, Kevin
Contact Email: martine.stead@stir.ac.uk
Citation: Stead M, Bauld L, Angus K, MacDonald L, Munafo M, Attwood A, Ataya A, Fuller E & Pickering K (2013) Scoping and Feasibility Study to Develop and Apply a Methodology for Retrospective Adjustment of Alcohol Consumption Data. Department of Health (DH). Public Health Research Consortium.
Issue Date: Oct-2013
Publisher: Public Health Research Consortium
Abstract: Aims and methods A scoping and feasibility study was commissioned by the Department of Health through the Public Health Research Consortium (http://phrc.lshtm.ac.uk/) to research, develop and apply a methodology that allows for retrospective adjustment of alcohol consumption trend data in England, to take account of changes over time in glass sizes and shape and alcohol strength.The objectives of the study were to: a) Review available research and other evidence to map key changes in alcohol strength, standard measures, glass size and shape since 1990; b) Interview key stakeholders to establish relevant assumptions and to inform the mapping exercise; c) Develop a robust formula/formulae for use in retrospective adjustment of official data; d) Apply the formula/formulae to official data on a selective basis; and e) Report the results and discuss implications for a full-scale study. Part 1 of the report describes the methods and findings from the mapping element of the study (objectives a and b), while Part 2 describes the development of the methodology for retrospective adjustments of existing survey data, and their implications for estimates at two data points, 1995 and 2000, and further considers the implications for a full-scale study (objectives c to e). Findings This report has identified key changes in alcohol strength, standard measures, glass size and shape since 1990, focusing primarily on changes relating to beer, wine and cider. It has then used this evidence to estimate the actual alcoholic strength of beer (including shandy and cider) and winebetween 1990 and 2005, and - in the case of wine - changes in the average glass size, and to examine the implications for retrospective adjustment of alcohol consumption survey data over the period.
Type: Research Report
URL: http://phrc.lshtm.ac.uk/papers/FINAL_REPORT_PHRC_Scoping_and_feasibility_study_-_alcohol_consumption_data_(October_2013).pdf
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/18362
Rights: The publisher has not yet responded to our queries therefore this work cannot be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Institute for Social Marketing
Institute for Social Marketing
Institute for Social Marketing
Institute for Social Marketing
University of Bristol
University of Bristol
University of Bristol
NatCen Social Research (NatCen)
NatCen Social Research (NatCen)

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