Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/16779
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Effects of graded levels of arachidonic acid on the reproductive physiology of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis): fatty acid composition, prostaglandins and steroid levels in the blood of broodstock bred in captivity
Authors: Norambuena, Fernando
Estevez, Alicia
Mananos, Evaristo
Bell, J Gordon
Carazo, Ignacio
Duncan, Neil
Keywords: Senegalese sole
Fish blood
Arachidonic acids
Prostaglandins
Steroids
Issue Date: 15-Sep-2013
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Norambuena F, Estevez A, Mananos E, Bell JG, Carazo I & Duncan N (2013) Effects of graded levels of arachidonic acid on the reproductive physiology of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis): fatty acid composition, prostaglandins and steroid levels in the blood of broodstock bred in captivity, General and Comparative Endocrinology, 191, pp. 92-101.
Abstract: Previous studies on Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) indicated that cultured broodstock (first generation, G1) have lower tissue levels of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6, ARA) than wild counterparts. ARA is metabolized to form prostaglandins (PGs) that are involved in steroid production and follicle maturation in fish. In the present study the effects of different dietary levels of ARA on blood lipid and fatty acid composition, prostaglandin (PGF2α, PGF3α, PGE2 and PGE3) levels and plasmatic steroid levels (11-ketotestosterone, 11-KT, testosterone, T and estradiol, E2) in G1 Senegalese sole were studied. For this purpose, 12 groups of ten fish (1:1 male and female), were fed six diets (each diets was fed to two groups) with different dietary ARA levels over nine months (diets A = 0.7, B = 1.6, C = 2.3, D = 3.2, E = 5.0, F = 6.0% ARA). ARA and CHOL levels in blood showed a significant increase in an ARA dose related manner (P < 0.05) whereas EPA and EPA/ARA ratio were reduced. In males, steroid (11-KT and T) levels increased significantly with increasing dietary ARA in a dose dependent manner, whereas in females E2 did not show any change related to dietary ARA content. Plasma concentration of 3-series PGs (i.e., PGE3 and PGF3α) were reduced in parallel to increased ARA levels in blood (P < 0.05) and levels of PGs 3-series were always higher than 2-series PGs (PGE2 and PGF2α). In conclusion there is an effect of dietary ARA on steroid production of Senegalese sole males, which might have important consequences in the reproduction of cultured fish.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/16779
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygcen.2013.06.006
Rights: Published in General and Comparative Endocrinologyby Elsevier; Elsevier believes that individual authors should be able to distribute their accepted author manuscripts for their personal voluntary needs and interests, e.g. posting to their websites or their institution’s repository, e-mailing to colleagues. The Elsevier Policy is as follows: Authors retain the right to use the accepted author manuscript for personal use, internal institutional use and for permitted scholarly posting provided that these are not for purposes of commercial use or systematic distribution. An "accepted author manuscript" is the author’s version of the manuscript of an article that has been accepted for publication and which may include any author-incorporated changes suggested through the processes of submission processing, peer review, and editor-author communications.
Notes: Solea solea ; Arachidonic acids ; Fish culture ; Fishes Nutrition
Affiliation: IRTA-Sant Carles de la Rapita, Spain
IRTA
Spanish Council for Scientific Research
Aquaculture
IRTA-Sant Carles de la Rapita, Spain
IRTA-Sant Carles de la Rapita, Spain

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