Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/15897
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Community professionals' management of client care: a mixed-methods systematic review
Authors: Kolehmainen, Niina
Francis, Jill
Duncan, Edward
Fraser, Cynthia
Contact Email: edward.duncan@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: 20
2009/10
advantage
analysis
Assessment
Behaviour
Benefits
Bibliographies
body
care
CLIENTS
Communities
community
concept
Concepts
CONTACT
data
DATA analysis
Development
evidence
experience
experiences
guidance
Health
health and social care services
inclusion
ISSUES
language
LITERATURE
Management
Measurement
method
methods
model
Models
ORGANIZATION
Organizations
policies
Policy
Population
POPULATIONS
Practice
professional
professionals
qualitative
QUALITY
relationship
Research
review
SEARCH
service
services
social care
support
systematic review
treatment
Issue Date: Jan-2010
Publisher: SAGE for Royal Society of Medicine Press
Citation: Kolehmainen N, Francis J, Duncan E & Fraser C (2010) Community professionals' management of client care: a mixed-methods systematic review, Journal of Health Services Research and Policy, 15 (1), pp. 47-55.
Abstract: Objectives: To review the literature on individual community professionals' caseload management (behaviours related to assessment, treatment and discharging of clients) to identify the main themes and concepts, and to synthesize the findings to inform practice, policy and research. Methods: Publications were systematically identified from electronic databases, hand searches of bibliographies, and contact with professional organizations. There were no restrictions on language, the nature of publications or publication year. Procedures were systematically applied for quality appraisal and data extraction. Qualitative and descriptive quantitative methods were used for data analysis and synthesis. Results: Search criteria yielded 2048 papers of which 42 papers met the inclusion criteria. Thirty-five percent of these were based on research, the rest on professionals' experiences. The papers covered 16 professional and 20 client populations, and their quality was generally poor. Analysis identified six broad themes: definitions of caseload management, caseload measurement and 'tools', models of caseload management practice, client-professional relationship, discharging and professional guidance. Six papers presented issues that related to but did not fit within these themes. Current caseload management tools and models of caseload management practice had a poor evidence base. Five papers described benefits of team-based approaches. Professional guidance for caseload management is limited in detail and relevance to daily practice. Conclusions: Although there is a considerable literature on caseload management, it is not possible to make summative conclusions. Policy-makers and professional bodies should encourage and support development of research evidence about the ways to achieve effective, efficient and equitable caseload management. Health and social care services considering implementing caseload management tools or models of practice should critically appraise their basis, and consider their potential advantages as well as disadvantages.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/15897
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1258/jhsrp.2009.008157
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
NMAHP Research
University of Aberdeen

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