Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/15658
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Adult learning, health and well-being – changing lives
Authors: Field, John
Contact Email: john.field@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: AONTAS The National Adult Learning Organisation
Citation: Field J (2011) Adult learning, health and well-being – changing lives, Adult Learner, pp. 13-25.
Abstract: It is increasingly important for adult educators to articulate more clearly their understanding of the benefits and outcomes of adult learning. This paper reviews existing evidence of the impact of participation in education, and particularly explores the relevance of recent studies of how learning has influenced adults' health and well-being. Overall, the balance of evidence suggests that learning has clear, identifiable positive effects for both well-being and health. Adult educators should, though, treat these findings with care. The relationships are probabilistic, and do not imply that all individuals will benefit in the same ways from any type of learning; and in most cases, the effects seem relatively small. However, given the well-known challenges of persuading adults to improve their health or well-being by other means, this evidence is important, and confirms' practitioners experiences of the transformations that learning can produce in people's lives.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/15658
URL: http://www.aontas.com/download/pdf/adult_learner_2011.pdf
Rights: The publisher has granted permission for use of this work in this Repository. Published in Adult Learner, 2011, pp.13-25. Available at: http://www.aontas.com/download/pdf/adult_learner_2011.pdf
Affiliation: Education

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
adult_learner_2011.pdf302.32 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.