Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/1401

Appears in Collections:School of Applied Social Science Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Negotiating Migrant Identities: Young People in Bolivia and Argentina
Authors: Punch, Samantha
Contact Email: s.v.punch@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: migration
identity
young people
Argentina
Bolivia
Issue Date: Feb-2007
Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Citation: Punch S (2007) Negotiating Migrant Identities: Young People in Bolivia and Argentina, Children's Geographies, 5 (1 & 2), pp. 95-112.
Abstract: In rural Bolivia, like many rural areas of the majority world, there are few opportunities for permanent employment and most young people do not have access to their own land. Consequently, many young people in southern Bolivia migrate seasonally to Argentina and their migratory experience provides them with a sense of collective identity during periods spent within their home community. It also enables them to access consumer goods as well as to continue to maintain interdependent family ties by contributing financially to their households. This paper, based on ethnographic fieldwork in rural Bolivia, considers the positive and negative ways in which the young migrant identity offers young people alternative youth transitions as well as enhances their social and economic autonomy.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/1401
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14733280601108213
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author; you can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Sociology/Social Pol&Criminology

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