Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12961
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: No association between Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) gene variation and endurance athlete status in Kenyans
Authors: Scott, Robert A
Moran, Colin Neil
Wilson, Richard H
Onywera, Vincent
Boit, Michael K
Goodwin, William H
Gohlke, Peter
Payne, John
Montgomery, Hugh
Pitsiladis, Yannis P
Contact Email: colin.moran@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: ACE genotype
I/D
endurance
genetics
ACE activity
Kenyan
African
athletes
Issue Date: Jun-2005
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Scott RA, Moran CN, Wilson RH, Onywera V, Boit MK, Goodwin WH, Gohlke P, Payne J, Montgomery H & Pitsiladis YP (2005) No association between Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) gene variation and endurance athlete status in Kenyans, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 141 (2), pp. 169-175.
Abstract: East African runners are continually successful in international distance running. The extent to which genetic factors influence this phenomenon is unknown. The insertion (I) rather than deletion (D) of a 287 bp fragment in the human angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene is associated with lower circulating and tissue ACE activity and with endurance performance amongst Caucasians. To assess the association between ACE gene variation and elite endurance athlete status in an African population successful in distance running, DNA samples were obtained from 221 national Kenyan athletes (N), 70 international Kenyan athletes (I), and 85 members of the general Kenyan population (C). Blood samples were obtained from C and assayed for circulating ACE activity. ACE I/D (rs????—from NCBI SNPdb first time poly mentioned) genotype was determined, as was genotype at A22982GD (rs????—from NCBI SNPdb first time poly mentioned) which has been shown to associate more closely with ACE levels in African subjects than the I/D polymorphism. ACE I/D and A22982G genotypes explained 13 and 24% of variation in circulating ACE activity levels (P = 0.034 and less than 0.001 respectively). I/D genotype was not associated with elite endurance athlete status (df = 4, χ2 = 4.1, P = 0.39). In addition, genotype at 22982 was not associated with elite endurance athlete status (df = 4, χ2 = 5.7, P = 0.23). Nor was the A allele at 22982, which is associated with lower ACE activity, more prevalent in N (0.52) or I (0.41) relative to C (0.53). We conclude that ACE I/D and A22982G polymorphisms are not strongly associated with elite endurance athlete status amongst Kenyans.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12961
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpb.2005.05.001
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Glasgow
Sport
University of Glasgow
Kenyatta University
Kenyatta University
University of Central Lancashire
University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Royal Free and University College Medical School
University College London
University of Glasgow

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