Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12950
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Exercise training has greater effects on insulin sensitivity in daughters of patients with type 2 diabetes than in women with no family history of diabetes
Authors: Barwell, Nicholas D
Malkova, Dalia
Moran, Colin Neil
Cleland, Stephen J
Packard, Chris J
Zammit, Victor A
Gill, Jason M R
Contact Email: colin.moran@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: diabetes family history
exercise
insulin resistance
insulin sensitivity
leptin
offspring
training
women
Issue Date: Oct-2008
Publisher: Springer
Citation: Barwell ND, Malkova D, Moran CN, Cleland SJ, Packard CJ, Zammit VA & Gill JMR (2008) Exercise training has greater effects on insulin sensitivity in daughters of patients with type 2 diabetes than in women with no family history of diabetes, Diabetologia, 51 (10), pp. 1912-1919.
Abstract: Aims/hypothesis - Sedentary offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes are often more insulin-resistant than persons with no family history of diabetes, but when active or fit offspring of type 2 diabetic patients are compared with non-diabetic persons, differences in insulin resistance are less evident. This study aimed to determine the effects of an exercise training intervention on insulin sensitivity in both groups. Methods - Women offspring (n = 34) of type 2 diabetic patients (offspring age 35.6 ± 7.0 years, BMI 28.1 ± 5.1 kg/m2) and 36 matched female controls (age 33.6 ± 6.1 years, BMI 27.3 ± 4.7 kg/m2) participated. Body composition, fitness and metabolic measurements were made at baseline and after a controlled 7 week exercise intervention. Results - At baseline, insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was 22% lower in offspring than controls (p less than 0.05), despite similar body fat and maximal oxygen uptake ( [(V)\dot]O2max )VO2max values in the two groups. ISI increased by 23% (p less than 0.05) in offspring following the exercise intervention, compared with 7% (NS) in the controls. Increases in [(V)\dot]O2maxVO2maxwere similar in both groups (controls 12%, offspring 15%, p less than 0.05 for both). Plasma leptin concentrations decreased significantly in the offspring (−24%, p less than 0.01) but not in controls (0%, NS). Change in ISI correlated significantly with baseline ISI (r = −0.47, p less than 0.0005) and change in leptin (r = −0.43, p less than 0.0005). The latter relationship was not attenuated by adjustment for changes in body fat. Conclusions/interpretation - Offspring, but not controls, significantly increased ISI in response to an exercise intervention, indicating that insulin sensitivity is more highly modulated by physical activity in daughters of patients with type 2 diabetes than in women with no family history of the disease.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12950
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-008-1097-6
Rights: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.
Affiliation: University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow
Sport
University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow
University of Warwick
University of Glasgow



This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.