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Appears in Collections:Management, Work and Organisation Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Dopaminergic genotype biases spatial attention in healthy children
Authors: Bellgrove, Mark A
Chambers, C D
Johnson, Katherine A
Daibhis, Aoife
Daly, Michael
Hawi, Ziarih
Lambert, David
Gill, Michael
Robertson, Ian H
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Keywords: dopamine
spatial attention
directed attention
Issue Date: Aug-2007
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Bellgrove MA, Chambers CD, Johnson KA, Daibhis A, Daly M, Hawi Z, Lambert D, Gill M & Robertson IH (2007) Dopaminergic genotype biases spatial attention in healthy children, Molecular Psychiatry, 12 (8), pp. 786-792.
Abstract: In everyday life, our sensory system is bombarded with visual input and we rely upon attention to select only those inputs that are relevant to behavioural goals. Typically, humans can shift their attention from one visual field to the other with little cost to perception. In cases of 'unilateral neglect', however, there is a persistent bias of spatial attention towards the same side as the damaged cerebral hemisphere. We used a visual orienting task to examine the influence of functional polymorphisms of the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) on individual differences in spatial attention in normally developing children. DAT1 genotype significantly influenced spatial bias. Healthy children who were homozygous for alleles that influence the expression of dopamine transporters in the brain displayed inattention for left-sided stimuli, whereas heterozygotes did not. Our data provide the first evidence in healthy individuals of a genetically mediated bias in spatial attention that is related to dopamine signalling.
Type: Journal Article
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Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Trinity College, Dublin
University College London
Trinity College, Dublin
Trinity College, Dublin
Trinity College, Dublin
Trinity College, Dublin
Trinity College, Dublin
Trinity College, Dublin

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