Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12862
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: 'Tinged with bitterness': Re-presenting stress in family care
Authors: Forbat, Liz
Contact Email: elizabeth.forbat@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: 2002
Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Citation: Forbat L (2002) 'Tinged with bitterness': Re-presenting stress in family care, Disability and Society, 17 (7), pp. 759-768.
Abstract: The provision of care within families, and specifically the difficulties within such relationships, has become the focus of much research, legislation and debate in recent years. This paper explores carers' and carees' talk about 'stress', home-based care, and comments on how such talk is reflected in UK social policy. Carers' and carees' accounts are presented to theorise the construction of difficulties in the present relationship --focusing in particular on the taking up of or resistance to roles and responsibilities within the family. The way in which competing discourses and discursive strategies are deployed to achieve certain effects within the family, social services and other support agencies is also explored. Family care is re-presented with a focus on language, and a reflection on how such relationships can become tinged with bitterness.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12862
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0968759022000039055
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: HS Research - Stirling

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