Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12466
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Sprint interval and endurance training are equally effective in increasing muscle microvascular density and eNOS content in sedentary males
Authors: Cocks, Matthew
Shaw, Christopher S
Shepherd, Sam O
Fisher, James P
Ranasinghe, Aaron M
Barker, Thomas A
Tipton, Kevin
Wagenmakers, Anton J M
Contact Email: k.d.tipton@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Feb-2013
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell / Physiological Society
Citation: Cocks M, Shaw CS, Shepherd SO, Fisher JP, Ranasinghe AM, Barker TA, Tipton K & Wagenmakers AJM (2013) Sprint interval and endurance training are equally effective in increasing muscle microvascular density and eNOS content in sedentary males, Journal of Physiology, 591 (3), pp. 641-656.
Abstract: Sprint interval training (SIT) has been proposed as a time efficient alternative to endurance training (ET) for increasing skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and improving certain cardiovascular functions. In this study we sought to make the first comparisons of the structural and endothelial enzymatic changes in skeletal muscle microvessels in response to ET and SIT. Sixteen young sedentary males (age 21 ± SEM 0.7 years, BMI 23.8 ± SEM 0.7 kg m-2) were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of ET (40-60 min cycling at ∼65% , 5 times per week) or SIT (4-6 Wingate tests, 3 times per week). Muscle biopsies were taken from the m. vastus lateralis before and following 60 min cycling at 65% VO2peak to measure muscle microvascular endothelial eNOS content, eNOS serine1177 phosphorylation, NOX2 content and capillarisation using quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy. Whole body insulin sensitivity, arterial stiffness and blood pressure were also assessed. ET and SIT increased skeletal muscle microvascular eNOS content (ET 14%; P less than 0.05, SIT 36%; P less than 0.05), with a significantly greater increase observed following SIT (P less than 0.05). Sixty minutes of moderate intensity exercise increased eNOS ser1177 phosphorylation in all instances (P less than 0.05), but basal and post-exercise eNOS ser1177 phosphorylation was lower following both training modes. All microscopy measures of skeletal muscle capillarisation (P less than 0.05) were increased with SIT or ET, while neither endothelial nor sarcolemmal NOX2 was changed. Both training modes reduced aortic stiffness and increased whole body insulin sensitivity (P less than 0.05). In conclusion, in sedentary males SIT and ET are effective in improving muscle microvascular density and eNOS protein content.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12466
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2012.239566
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Birmingham
University of Birmingham
University of Birmingham
University of Birmingham
University of Birmingham
University of Birmingham
Sport
University of Birmingham

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