Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12183
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The Patriot Game: Football's Famous 'Tartan Army'
Authors: Bradley, Joseph
Contact Email: j.m.bradley@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: culture
football
identity
nationalism
politics
Issue Date: Jun-2002
Publisher: SAGE Publications / International Sociology of Sport Association
Citation: Bradley J (2002) The Patriot Game: Football's Famous 'Tartan Army', International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 37 (2), pp. 177-197.
Abstract: Whose Scotland? Who is Scottish? What is Scottish? What does Scottish mean in the sporting context? This article seeks to demonstrate that these contemporary questions among others, relating to Scotland and Scottish identity, can be explored through the medium of the most popular sport in Scotland. Further, in an environment where everyone 'volunteers' their Scottishness, the perceived cause of the Scottish international team can be utilized to investigate some of the social, cultural and political complexities that lie underneath an image of oneness. This article concludes that, through the complexity of the Scottish national football side's supporters, we find that popular notions of Scotland can often be incomplete and consideration requires to be given to ethnic, religious and geographical factors in any sociological thesis relating to contemporary Scottish identity.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12183
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1012690202037002004
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Sport

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