Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12161
Appears in Collections:Management, Work and Organisation Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Gratitude influences sleep through the mechanism of pre-sleep cognitions
Authors: Wood, Alex M
Joseph, Stephen
Lloyd, Joanna
Atkins, Samuel
Contact Email: alex.wood@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Gratitude
Personality
Sleep
Pre-sleep cognitions
Positive psychology
Issue Date: Jan-2009
Publisher: Elsevier for the European Association for Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry and Psychosomatics / International College of Psychosomatic Medicine
Citation: Wood AM, Joseph S, Lloyd J & Atkins S (2009) Gratitude influences sleep through the mechanism of pre-sleep cognitions, Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 66 (1), pp. 43-48.
Abstract: Objectives: To test whether individual differences in gratitude are related to sleep after controlling for neuroticism and other traits. To test whether pre-sleep cognitions are the mechanism underlying this relationship. Method: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted with a large (186 males, 215 females) community sample (ages=18-68 years, mean=24.89, S.D.=9.02), including 161 people (40%) scoring above 5 on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, indicating clinically impaired sleep. Measures included gratitude, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), self-statement test of pre-sleep cognitions, the Mini-IPIP scales of Big Five personality traits, and the Social Desirability Scale. Results: Gratitude predicted greater subjective sleep quality and sleep duration, and less sleep latency and daytime dysfunction. The relationship between gratitude and each of the sleep variables was mediated by more positive pre-sleep cognitions and less negative pre-sleep cognitions. All of the results were independent of the effect of the Big Five personality traits (including neuroticism) and social desirability. Conclusion: This is the first study to show that a positive trait is related to good sleep quality above the effect of other personality traits, and to test whether pre-sleep cognitions are the mechanism underlying the relationship between any personality trait and sleep. The study is also the first to show that trait gratitude is related to sleep and to explain why this occurs, suggesting future directions for research, and novel clinical implications.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12161
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2008.09.002
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Socio-Management
University of Nottingham
University of Warwick
University of Warwick

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