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Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Independent predictors of breastfeeding intention in a disadvantaged population of pregnant women
Authors: McInnes, Rhona
Love, Janet G
Stone, David H
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Issue Date: 2001
Publisher: BioMed Central
Citation: McInnes R, Love JG & Stone DH (2001) Independent predictors of breastfeeding intention in a disadvantaged population of pregnant women, BMC Public Health, 1 (10).
Abstract: Background: Breastfeeding rates in Scotland are very low, particularly in the more disadvantaged areas. Despite a number of interventions to promote breastfeeding very few women actually intend to breastfeed their baby. The aim of this study was to identify personal and social factors independently associated with intention to breastfeed. Methods: Nine hundred and ninety seven women from two socio-economically disadvantaged housing estates located on the outskirts of Glasgow participated in a study that aimed to increase the prevalence of breastfeeding. Self-administered questionnaires completed by each participant collected information in early pregnancy, prior to exposure to the study intervention, on feeding intention, previous feeding experience and socio-demographic data. Results: Five factors were independently predictive of breastfeeding intention. These were previous breastfeeding experience, living with a partner, smoking, parity and maternal age. After adjusting for these five factors, neither deprivation nor receipt of milk tokens provided useful additional predictive information. Conclusion: In this population of socially disadvantaged pregnant women we identified five variables that were independently predictive of breastfeeding intention. These variables could be useful in identifying women at greatest risk of choosing not to breastfeed. Appropriate promotional efforts could then be designed to give due consideration to individual circumstances.
Type: Journal Article
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Rights: © 2001 Mclnnes et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at:
Affiliation: HS Research - Stirling
University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow

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