Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/11995
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Using shared goal setting to improve access and equity: a mixed methods study of the Good Goals intervention in children's occupational therapy
Authors: Kolehmainen, Niina
MacLennan, Graeme
Ternent, Laura
Duncan, Edward
Duncan, Eilidh M
Ryan, Stephen B
McKee, Lorna
Francis, Jill
Contact Email: edward.duncan@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: 16-Aug-2012
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd
Citation: Kolehmainen N, MacLennan G, Ternent L, Duncan E, Duncan EM, Ryan SB, McKee L & Francis J (2012) Using shared goal setting to improve access and equity: a mixed methods study of the Good Goals intervention in children's occupational therapy, Implementation Science, 7 (76).
Abstract: Background: Access and equity in children's therapy services may be improved by directing clinicians' use of resources toward specific goals that are important to patients. A practice-change intervention (titled 'Good Goals') was designed to achieve this. This study investigated uptake, adoption, and possible effects of that intervention in children's occupational therapy services. Methods: Mixed methods case studies (n = 3 services, including 46 therapists and 558 children) were conducted. The intervention was delivered over 25 weeks through face-to-face training, team workbooks, and 'tools for change'. Data were collected before, during, and after the intervention on a range of factors using interviews, a focus group, case note analysis, routine data, document analysis, and researchers' observations. Results: Factors related to uptake and adoptions were: mode of intervention delivery, competing demands on therapists' time, and leadership by service manager. Service managers and therapists reported that the intervention: helped therapists establish a shared rationale for clinical decisions; increased clarity in service provision; and improved interactions with families and schools. During the study period, therapists' behaviours changed: identifying goals, odds ratio 2.4 (95% CI 1.5 to 3.8); agreeing goals, 3.5 (2.4 to 5.1); evaluating progress, 2.0 (1.1 to 3.5). Children's LoT decreased by two months [95% CI -8 to +4 months] across the services. Cost per therapist trained ranged from £1,003 to £1,277, depending upon service size and therapists' salary bands. Conclusions: Good Goals is a promising quality improvement intervention that can be delivered and adopted in practice and may have benefits. Further research is required to evaluate its: (i) impact on patient outcomes, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and (ii) transferability to other clinical contexts.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/11995
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-7-76
Rights: © 2012 Kolehmainen et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.implementationscience.com/content/7/1/76
Affiliation: University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
NMAHP Research
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen

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