Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/11858
Appears in Collections:Marketing and Retail Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Neighbourhood deprivation and the price and availability of fruit and vegetables in Scotland
Authors: Cummins, Steven
Smith, Dianna M
Aitken, Zoe
Dawson, John
Marshall, David
Sparks, Leigh
Anderson, Annie S
Contact Email: leigh.sparks@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: access
deprivation
diet
food store
neighbourhood
Scotland
Issue Date: Oct-2010
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell for the British Dietetic Association
Citation: Cummins S, Smith DM, Aitken Z, Dawson J, Marshall D, Sparks L & Anderson AS (2010) Neighbourhood deprivation and the price and availability of fruit and vegetables in Scotland, Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 23 (5), pp. 494-501.
Abstract: Background: Previous research has suggested that fruits and vegetables are more expensive and less readily available in more deprived communities. However, this evidence is mainly based on small samples drawn from specific communities often located in urban settings and thus is not generalisable to national contexts. The present study explores the influence of neighbourhood deprivation and local retail structure on the price and availability of fruit and vegetables in a sample of areas representing the diversity of urban-rural environments across Scotland, UK. Methods: A sample of 310 stores located in 10 diverse areas of Scotland was surveyed and data on the price and availability of a basket of 15 fruit and vegetable items were collected. The data were analysed to identify the influence of store type and neighbourhood deprivation on the price and availability of fruits and vegetables. Results: Neighbourhood deprivation and store type did not significantly predict the price of a basket of fruit and vegetables within the sample, although baskets did decrease in price as store size increased. The highest prices were found in the smallest stores located in the most deprived areas. Availability of fruit and vegetables is lower in small shops located within deprived neighbourhoods compared to similar shops in affluent areas. Overall, availability increases with increasing store size. Conclusions: Availability of fruit and vegetables significantly varies by neighbourhood deprivation in small stores. Policies aimed at promoting sales of fruit and vegetable in these outlets may benefit residents in deprived areas.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/11858
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-277X.2010.01071.x
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Queen Mary, University of London
Queen Mary, University of London
Queen Mary, University of London
Marketing and Retail Division
University of Edinburgh
Marketing and Retail Division
University of Dundee

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Sparks_2010_Neighbourhood_deprivation_and_the_price_and_availability_of_fruit.pdf158.93 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 31/12/2999     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.