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Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Research Reports
Peer Review Status: Unrefereed
Title: Population control in farmed tilapias
Authors: Little, David Colin
Mair, Graham C
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Citation: Little DC & Mair GC (1991) Population control in farmed tilapias, Naga, 14 (3), pp. 8-13.
Keywords: tilapia
Issue Date: Jul-1991
Publisher: ICLARM
Abstract: First paragraph: Breeding at a small size in tilapia diverts energy from growth into reproduction (territorial/courtship behavior and the metabolic cost of gamete production). Further, the progeny produced by the stocked fish compete for available space and food resources, thereby inhibiting the growth of the stocked fish, especially in ponds, where space and food quickly become limiting. Even in many parts of Southeast Asia where marketable size of tilapia is small (80-100 g), recruitment results in harvests that include 10-20% of small, larely unmarketable, fish. In African countries and urban areas in Asia where the premium market size for fresh fish is much larger, this figure can be as high as 50%.
Type: Journal Article
Rights: The publisher has not responded to our queries therefore this work cannot be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Aquaculture
Flinders University

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