Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/11376
Appears in Collections:History and Politics Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: International Climate Policy after Copenhagen: Towards a 'Building Blocks' Approach
Authors: Falkner, Robert
Stephan, Hannes
Vogler, John
Contact Email: h.r.stephan@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: international climate change policy
international regime
Copenhagen conference
Issue Date: Oct-2010
Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science and John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Citation: Falkner R, Stephan H & Vogler J (2010) International Climate Policy after Copenhagen: Towards a 'Building Blocks' Approach, Global Policy, 1 (3), pp. 252-262.
Abstract: This article reviews the options for future international climate policy after the 2009 Copenhagen conference. It argues that a major reassessment of the current approach to building a climate regime is required. This approach, which we refer to as the 'global deal' strategy, is predicated on the idea of negotiating a comprehensive, universal and legally binding treaty that prescribes, in a top-down fashion, generally applicable policies based on previously agreed principles. From a review of the history of the 'global deal' strategy from Rio (1992) to Kyoto (1997) and beyond we conclude that this approach has been producing diminishing returns for some time, and that it is time to consider an alternative path – if not goal – for climate policy. The alternative that, in our view, is most likely to move the world closer towards a working international climate regime is a 'building blocks' approach, which develops different elements of climate governance in an incremental fashion and embeds them in an international political framework. In fact, this alternative is already emergent in international politics. The goal of a full treaty has been abandoned for the next climate conference in Mexico, which is instead aiming at a number of partial agreements (on finance, forestry, technology transfer, adaptation) under the UNFCCC umbrella. For this to produce results, a more strategic approach is needed to ensure that – over time – such partial elements add up to an ambitious and internationally coordinated climate policy which does not drive down the level of aspiration and commitment.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/11376
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1758-5899.2010.00045.x
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: LSE
Politics
Keele University

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