Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/11336
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Social bundles: Thinking through the infant body
Authors: Brownlie, Julie
Sheach, Leith Valerie M
Contact Email: Julie.Brownlie@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: body
boundaries
immunization
infant
nature/culture
personhood
Issue Date: May-2011
Publisher: SAGE
Citation: Brownlie J & Sheach Leith VM (2011) Social bundles: Thinking through the infant body, Childhood, 18 (2), pp. 196-210.
Abstract: Drawing on a UK research study on immunization, this article investigates parents' understandings of the relationship between themselves, their infants, other bodies, the state, and cultural practices - material and symbolic. The article argues that infant bodies are best thought of as always social bundles, rather than as biobundles made social through state intervention; and concludes that, while the natural/cultural divide may now be widely accepted as artificial within the social sciences, we need to scrutinize how people in their everyday lives work out, and invest in, the distinction between the two.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/11336
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0907568210394879
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Sociology/Social Pol&Criminology
Robert Gordon University

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Brownlie and SheachLeith_Childhood_2011.pdf281.39 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 31/12/2999     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.