Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/1111
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Randomized, Controlled Trial of a Best-Practice Individualized Behavioral Program for Treatment of Childhood Overweight: Scottish Childhood Overweight Treatment Trial (SCOTT)
Authors: Hughes, Adrienne R
Stewart, Laura
Chapple, Jan
McColl, John H
Donaldson, Malcolm D C
Kelnar, Christopher J H
Zabihollah, Mehran
Ahmed, Faisal
Reilly, John J
Contact Email: adrienne.hughes@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Obesity
Overweight children
treatment
body mass index
physical activity
sedentary behavior
randomized controlled trial
Issue Date: Mar-2008
Publisher: American Academy of Pediatrics
Citation: Hughes AR, Stewart L, Chapple J, McColl JH, Donaldson MDC, Kelnar CJH, Zabihollah M, Ahmed F & Reilly JJ (2008) Randomized, Controlled Trial of a Best-Practice Individualized Behavioral Program for Treatment of Childhood Overweight: Scottish Childhood Overweight Treatment Trial (SCOTT), Pediatrics, 121 (3), pp. e539-e546.
Abstract: OBJECTIVE. To determine whether a generalisable best practice individualized behavioral intervention reduced BMI Z score relative to standard dietetic care among overweight children. METHODS. The design consisted of an assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial involving 134 overweight children (59 boys, 75 girls; BMI98th UK centile, age 5-11 years) randomized to a best practice behavioral program (intervention) or standard care (control). The intervention used family-centered counseling and behavioral strategies to modify diet, physical activity and sedentary behavior. BMI Z-score, weight, objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior, fat distribution, quality of life and height Z-score were recorded at baseline, 6 and 12 months. RESULTS. The intervention had no significant effect relative to standard care on BMI Z-score from baseline to 6 months (-0.10 vs -0.06; 95%CI -0.05 to 0.11) and 12 months (-0.07 vs -0.19; 95%CI -0.17 to 0.07). BMI Z score decreased significantly in both groups from baseline to six and 12 months. For those who complied with treatment, there was a significantly smaller weight (kg) increase in the intervention group compared to controls from baseline to six months (95%CI 0.05, 2.25). There were significant between group differences in favor of the intervention for changes in total physical activity (95% CI -199 to –31 accelerometer counts/minute), % of time spent in sedentary behavior (95%CI 0.8 to 6.3) and light intensity physical activity (95%CI -4.8 to -0.5). CONCLUSIONS. A generalizable, best practice individualized behavioral intervention had modest benefits on objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior but no significant effect on BMI Z score compared to standard care among overweight children. The modest magnitude of the benefits observed perhaps argues for a longer-term and more intense intervention, though such treatments may not be realistic for many healthcare systems.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/1111
URL: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2007-1786
Rights: 2008 © Copyright American Academy of Pediatrics. All rights reserved.; The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author; you can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Sport
Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh
Yorkhill Hospital
University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow
University of Edinburgh
University of Liverpool
University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow

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