Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10961
Appears in Collections:Communications, Media and Culture Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: State-media relations in post-apartheid South Africa: an application of comparative media systems theory
Authors: Hadland, Adrian
Contact Email: adrian.hadland@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: 2007
Publisher: Southern African Communication Association
Citation: Hadland A (2007) State-media relations in post-apartheid South Africa: an application of comparative media systems theory, Communicare: Journal for Communication Sciences in Southern Africa, 26 (2), pp. 1-17.
Abstract: In 2004, Daniel Hallin and Paolo Mancini published a landmark work of media theory entitled . The theory, like the models it makes use of, has a high degree of relevance for South African media scholars. Primarily, the theory investigates the relationship between the state and the media, an interconnection of profound significance in the South African context, yet one that has not been explored sufficiently by scholars. This article, which focuses primarily on South Africa's print media sector, sets out the parameters, major dimensions and some indicators of the Three Models paradigm. It then presents recent research in which the theory is applied to South Africa. It concludes that South Africa's media system falls largely into the Polarised Pluralist model though it retains strong liberal model traits.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10961
URL: http://www.sabinet.co.za/abstracts/comcare/comcare_v26_n2_a3.html
Rights: The publisher has not responded to our queries therefore this work cannot be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Communications, Media and Culture

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