Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10486
Appears in Collections:Economics Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Non-attendance to attributes in environmental choice analysis: a latent class specification
Authors: Campbell, Danny
Hensher, David A
Scarpa, Riccardo
Contact Email: danny.campbell@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: attribute non-attendance
latent class
scale-adjusted latent class
stated choice
willingness to pay
Issue Date: Oct-2011
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Citation: Campbell D, Hensher DA & Scarpa R (2011) Non-attendance to attributes in environmental choice analysis: a latent class specification, Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 54 (8), pp. 1061-1076.
Abstract: There is a growing literature on the design and use of stated choice experiments. Analysts have developed sophisticated ways of analysing such data, using a form of discrete choice model to identify the marginal (dis)utility associated with observed attributes linked to an alternative, as well as accounting for preference and scale heterogeneity. There is also a growing literature studying the attribute processing rules that respondents use as a way of simplifying the task of choosing. Using the latent class framework, we define classes based on rules that recognise the non-attendance to one or more attributes. These processing rules are postulated to be used in real markets as a form of cognitive rationalisation. The empirical study involves a choice amongst rural environmental landscape improvements in the Republic of Ireland. We estimate models and calculate a marginal willingness to pay (WTP) for four landscape improvements, and contrast it with the results from a model specification in which all attributes are assumed to be attended to with parameter preservation. We find that the marginal WTP is, on average, significantly higher when full attribute preservation specification is adopted, raising questions about the appropriateness of current practice that assume a fully compensatory attribute choice rule.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10486
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09640568.2010.549367
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Economics
University of Sydney
University of Waikato

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